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Patients need doctors to speak up

Patients need doctors to speak up

regulators want them to shut up

NORTHERN, ONTARIO   ~~~~~~   May 5, 2021  (LSN)  “Call for help.” This is one of the first rules in every advanced life-saving course. When you see someone collapse, rush over to assess and call for help. Raise the alarm. Let people know.

Doctors and nurses do this all the time in hospitals across Canada. It would be professional misconduct to do otherwise.

What if someone collapses due to “public health orders or recommendations”? Should physicians speak up?

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) posted yesterday that “Physicians hold a unique position of trust and have a professional responsibility to not communicate anti-vaccine, anti-masking, anti-distancing and anti-lockdown statements …”

Countries worldwide have taken markedly different approaches to lockdown measures, social distancing, school closures, and other public health interventions. Canada currently scores 13 out of 15 countries for misery caused by our pandemic response according to the latest version of the COVID Misery Index, published by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute.

Countries differ on pandemic policy because no one approach carries greater evidence than any other. This was especially true at the start of the pandemic. We learn more each week, and if anything, studies do not support the stringent public health measures we have seen in Canada.

In February, Dr. Ari Joffe, critical care doctor and member of the health ethics centre at the University of Alberta, published “COVID-19: Rethinking the Lockdown Groupthink.” Joffe referenced 275 articles that show lockdowns offer marginal benefit, if any, and carry up to 10 times the risk. He suggests using focused protection guided by core principles of emergency management — a far better option than strict lockdowns. We should aim to prevent harm to the whole society while preserving health-care capacity, instead of focusing on only one risk.

According to one report, the Canadian pandemic response has led to 345,000 cancelled surgeries, procedures, and consultations. Last fall, the Canadian Medical Association estimated it would cost $1.3 billion to clear the backlog. Strict lockdown measures have added to mental health concerns, with much suffering going unreported.

In fairness, perhaps the CPSO had something else in mind. Maybe it worries there might be doctors who oppose all vaccines? Maybe the CPSO fears a cadre of anarchist doctors who inflame civil disobedience?

The CPSO already has policy to deal with this. Doctors support evidence-based treatment. Evidence shapes the standard of care. Treatments lacking evidence remain open to debate. Indeed, debate is the only way to find better evidence. This new policy of threatening doctors in the face of debatable policy with conflicting evidential support is something else entirely.

Despite undeniable suffering due to lockdowns, the CPSO wants Ontario doctors to stay quiet.

Physicians must not publicly question public health orders. Support official party. Do not speak up; shut up.

Doctors have a duty to warn patients and to help prevent injury and disease. Obvious risky behaviour makes this duty easy to follow. Do not drink and drive. Wear a seatbelt. Solid evidence supports it, and no physician would advocate otherwise.

Doctors also have a duty to challenge treatments that lack solid evidence. We need physicians to speak up when they see patients harmed by evolving public policy. When regulators threaten doctors for engaging in public debate, doctors go quiet and patients suffer.

Dr. Shawn Whatley is a Macdonald-Laurier Institute senior fellow and a past President of the Ontario Medical Association. He is the author of When Politics Comes Before Patients — Why and How Canadian Medicare is Failing.


 

© Troy Media
Troy Media is an editorial content provider to media outlets and its own hosted community news outlets across Canada.

Shawn Whatley

Shawn Whatley

Dr. Shawn Whatley served as the past President of the Ontario Medical Association (OMA) and has wide-ranging knowledge and experience in the field of healthcare policy. He is also the author of the highly-praised book on how to fix emergency wait times in Canada, No More Lethal Waits.

 

Northern Ontario 
Kenora, Rainy River, Dryden, Thunder Bay, Terrace Bay Marathon, Sault Ste Marie, Sudbury, North Bay, Ontario

#LSN_Health   #LSN_Opinion 

© Troy Media

Disclaimer
The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by Lake Superior News / Lake Superior Media.

Troy Media Founded in 2005, Troy Media has grown to become Canada’s largest independent provider of original editorial features, opinions and analysis. Content sourced from Troy Media appears in dozens of newspapers, news sites, blogs and radio reports daily. Annual readership is estimated to be greater than 750 million.

 

  • 5 May 2021
  • Author: Troy Media
  • Number of views: 937
  • Comments: 0
Categories: HealthOpinion
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Follow the numbers for TBDHU Easter Month Long Lockdown

Population of Thunder Bay District (2016)  146,048
April 8th 1st stay of stay at home order for 28 days

Date New
Cases
Active
Cases 
Resolved 
Cases
Deceased Hospitalized ICU
Apr 3 26 183 2673 53 12 3
Apr 5   9 163 2701 54 14 4
Apr 6  1 149 2716 54 14 5
Apr 7 15 148 2732 54 10 4
Apr 8  3 104 2779 54 10 4
Apr 9 12 101 2793 55 12 5
Apr 10 13   98 2809 55 13 5
Apr 11 Not  Reported        
Apr 12 13 91 2829 55 14 5
Apr 13 9 87 2841 56 13 4
Apr 14 4 72 2860 56 11 4
Apr 15 4 61 2875 56 10 5
Apri16 8 57 2885 58 12 4
Apr 17 4 56 2890 58 9 3
    Not  reported  Today    
             
Apr 20 11 54 2909 60 7 2
Apr 21  6 52 2916 61 7 2
Apr 22 11 59 2919 62 8 2
Apr 23 10 61 2927 62 8 2
Apr 24 10 67 2931 62 9 2
    Not  Reported  On Sundays    
Apr 26 10 69 2939 62 7 0
Apr 27  6 66 2948 62 8 2
Apr 28  5 61 2958 62 8 0
Apr 29 15 67 2967 62 7 0
Apr 30  1 63 2972 62 6 0
May 1  7 54 2988 62 6 1
May 2   Not Reported  On Sundays     
May 3 9 48 3003 62 6 1
May 4 6 44 3013 62 4 0
May 5 5 45 3017 62 5 0
May 6 5 45 3022 62 5 1
May 7 2 41 3028 62 3 1
May 8 5 37 3037 62 3 1
May 9   Not Reported  On Sundays    
May 10  7 40 3041 62 4 1
May 11  0 29 3052 62 3 1
May 12  8 31 3058 62 4 1
May 13  6 36 3059 62 4 1
May 14  4 34 3065 62 4 1
May 15  4 32 3071 62 4 1
May 16  Do  Not Report  On Sundays     
May 17  3 29 3077 62 4 1
May 18  1 25 3079 63 2 0
May 19  1 24 3081 63 2 0
May 20  7 31 3081 63 4 0
May 21  1 28 3085 63 5 0
May 22  4 25 3092 63 5 0
May 23 Do  Not  report  On Holidays     
May 24 Do Not  report  On Holidays     
May 25 4 24 3097 63 5 0
May 26  1 17 3105 63 3 0
May 27  5 19 3108 63 4 0
May 28 18
14
 3
 1
 33
First Nation
Distict 
TBay
3112 63 4 0
May 29 9
6
3
0
42
First Nation
Distict 
Thunder Bay
3117 63 5 0
May 30 Do  Not Report  on  Sundays    
May 31

17
8
4
5

54
First Nation
District 
Thunder Bay
3117 63 4 0
June  1  3
2
1
54
Thunder Bay
First Nation 
3120 63 3 0
June 2 4
2
2

Thunder Bay
First Nation
       
June 3 11
2
5
4
61
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3128 63 6 0
June 4 21
 1
13
 7
75
Thunder Bay
First Nation
Disrict 
3273 63 7 0
June 5 16
6

2
81
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3289 63 6 0
June 6 Do  Not  report on  Sunday     
June 7

10
 3
 6
 1

67
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3169 63 7 1
June 8   
 0
 0 
 1
 60
Thunder Bay
First Natiomn 
 District  
3175 63 5 1
June 9  
0
1

 
56
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3181 63 5 1
June 10

3
0
1

51
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3190 63 5 1
June 11  1
3
0
47
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
 
3198 63 5 2
June 12
1
 2
3
39
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District
       
June 13 Do  Not  remport on  Sunday  
June 14

1
5
0
 
33
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District
3224 63 6 3
             

 

Follow the Ontario numbers for Easter Month Long Lockdown

Ontario's 3rd lockdown start April 3 at 12.01 am. 
April 8th 1st stay of stay at home order for 28 days

Date Test Cases 
May
31
18,200 916
June 
1
20,300 699
June 3 34,300 870
June 4 32,300 914
June 5 27,800 744
June 6 22,600 663
June 7 15,200 525
June 8 17,600 469
June 9 30,500 411
June 10 31,400 590

June 11

28,900 574
June 12  24,100 502
June 13 20,700 530
June 14 13,600 447

 

Date Test Cases Date  Test  Cases Date  Test  Cases  Date  Test Cases
April 1  62,300 2,557 Apr 16 64,300 4,812 May  1 46,800 3,369 May 16 33,100 2,199
Apr 2 121,400 3,089 Apr 17  56,900 4,362 May 2 45,300 3,732 May 17 24,500 2,170
Apr 3   3,009 Apr 18 53,800 4,250 May 3 33,200 3,436 May 18 22,900 1,616
Apr 4   3,041 apr 19 42,900 4,447 May 4 33,700 2,791 May 19 38,400 1,588
Apr 5    2,938 Apr 20 40,600 3,469 May 5 45,800 2,941 May 20 45,400 2,400
Apr 6 37,500 3,065 Apr 21 51,900 4,212 May 6 54,100 3,424 May 21 37,100 1,890
Apr 7 49,900 3,215 apr 22 54,200 3,682 May 7 51,300 3,166 May 22 34,600 1,794
Apr 8 63,800 3,295 apr 23 56,200 4,505 May 8 47,800 2,864 May 23 31,200 1,691
Apr 9 61,400 4,227 Apr 24 52,200 4,094 May 9 38,500 3,216 May 24 16,900 1,446
Apr 10 61,400 3,813 Apr 25 46,700 3,947 May 10 27,200 2,716 May 25 20,200 1039
Apr 11 56,400 4,456 Apr 26 33,800 3,510 May 11 28,100 2,073 May 26 24,000 1,095
apr 12 47,900 4,401 Apr 27 34,000 3,265 May 12 45,700 2,320 May 27 37,700 1,135
Apr 13 42,200 3,670 Apr 28  50,200 3,480 May 13 47,600 2,759 May 28 40,900 1,273
Apr 14  54,200 4,156 Apr 29 56,900 3,871 May 14 44,000 2,362 May 29 33,600 1,057
Apr 15 65,600 4,736 Apr 30 53,100 3,887 May 15 42,300 2,584 May 30 26,600 1,033

 

TBDHU goes into Grey Lockdown March 1st 12.01 am.

Population of Thunder Bay District (2016)  146,048

Date  New
Cases
Active
Cases 
Resolved
Cases 
Deceased  Hospitalized 
ICU
Feb 27   335 1218 30 23 7
Feb 28   343 1239 30 26 9
March 1 56 376 1262 30 29 9
March 2  40 374 1304 30 26 9
March 3  26 389 1314 31 29 10
March 4 61 397 1366 32 29 10
March 5 48 389 1422 32 27 8
March 6 40 386 1465 32 35 11
March 7 111 470 1492 32 37 11
March 8 30 462 1529 33 36 10
March 9  58 458 1589 35 29 9
March 10 46 414 1677 37 31 10
March 11 46 423 1714 37 35 9
March 12 82 435 1784 37 35 8
March 13 43 446 1816 37 36 9
March 14 40 437 1865 37 37 9
March 15 51 446 1906 38 44 7
March 16 35 403 1984 38 39 8
March 17 68 424 2030 39 38 8
March 18 40 406 2088 39 39 12
March 19 38 399 2133 39 44 15
March 20 32 379 2185 39 45 16
March 21 20 362 2222 39 35 12
March 22  9 325 2267 40 35 12
March 23 29 305 2316 40 31 7
March 24 25 286 2355 45 26 5
March 25 33 283 2390 46 28 5
March 26 20 259 2434 46 28 4
March 27 29 233 2488 47 20 3
March 28  21 216 2526 47 19 4
March 29 12 207 2547 47 19 4
March 30 25 199 2576 51 17 3
March 31 34 216 2592 52 18 3
April 1 23 210 2621 52 18 3
             
             
             
             

This is the total number of deaths among cases in which COVID-19 was determined to be a contributing or underlying cause of death

 

Number of Test and Number of Cases of COVID Ontario

Date Tests Cases Date Tests  Cases  Date Tests Cases
Feb 11 68,800 945 Mar 1 35,000 1,023 Mar 19 56,100 1,745
Feb 12 62,000 1,076 Mar 2  30,800 966 Mar 20 52,100 1,829
Feb 13 58,800 1,300 Mar 3 52,600 958 Mar 21 49,200 1,791
Feb 14 48,700 981 Mar 4 65,600 994 Mar 22 31,100 1,699
Feb 15 27,000 964 Mar 5  64,700 1,250 Mar 23 32,600 1,546

Feb 16

30,400 904 Mar 6 57,800 990 Mar 24 52,000 1,571
Feb 17 34,000 847 Mar 7 46,600 329 Mar 25 60,100 2,380
Feb 18 56,200 1,038 Mar 8 38,100 568 Mar 26 53,400 2,169
Feb 19 65,400 1,150 Mar 9  33,300 1,185 Mar 27 61,000 2,453
Feb 20 57,200 1,228 Mar 10 54,100 1,316 Mar 28  50,200 2,448
Feb 21 Not report Not Report Mar 11 60,600 1,092 Mar 29  39,500 2,094
Feb 22 31,200 1,058 Mar 12 64,600 1,371 Mar 30  36,100 2,336
Feb 23 26,000 975 Mar 13  58,400 1,468 Mar 31 52,500 2,333
Feb 24  54,900 1,054 Mar 14 47,600 1,747 April 1  62,300 2,557
Feb 25 66,400 1,138 Mar 15 34,000 1,268      
Feb 26 64,000 1,258 Mar 16 28,500 1,074       
Feb 27 59,400 1,185 Mar 17 49,100 1,508      
Feb 28 49,200 1,062 Mar 18 58,600 1,553      
                 

 

Covid and test During Ontario Lockdown

December 26th is day one of lockdown in Ontario 

Date Tests #Cases  Date Test Cases Date  Tests Cases
Dec 26   2,142 Jan 11     Jan 26 30,700 1,740
Dec 27   2,005 Jan 12     Jan 27 55,200 1,670
Dec 28   1,939 Jan 13     Jan 28 64,700 2,093
Dec 29   2,553 Jan 14     Jan 29 69,000 1,837
Dec 30 39,200 2,923 Jan 15     Jan 30 59,600 2,063
Dec 31   3,328 Jan16  73,900 3,056 Jan 31 49,400 1,848
Jan 1   2,476       Feb 1 30,400 1,969
Jan 2   3,363 Jan 17     Feb 2 28,600 745
Jan 3 49,800 2,964 Jan 18     Feb 3 52,400 1,172
Jan
4
    Jan 19     Feb 4 64,500 1,563
Jan 5 35,200 3,128 Jan 20     Feb 5  62,700 1,670
Jan 6     Jan 21 70,300 2,632 Feb 6 62,300 1,388
Jan 7     Jan 22 71,800 2,662 Feb 7 51,700 1,489
Jan 8     Jan 23 63,500 2,359 Feb 8  28,300 1,265

Jan 9

72,900 3,443 Jan 24  48,900 2,417 Feb 9 30,800 1,022
Jan 10     Jan 25 36,000 1,958 Feb 10 52,500 1,072

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