Search User Login Menu
Tools
Close
Close

Health 2021

Health News/Health 2021
Health News Serving the Lake Superior Region, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and Northern Ontario ~ Northwest, Thunder Bay, Algoma and Sudbury District Health Units ~ Cook, Lake and St Louis Counties

Banners

Latest Health News

Need for Proper Masks Reconized
Robert McKenzie
/ Categories: Ontario, Health 2021

Need for Proper Masks Reconized

COVID Fourth Doses

THUNDER BAY,  SAULT STE MARIE, ONTARIO  ~~~~  December 30, 2021  (LSNews)  — In response to the highly transmissible Omicron variant, the Ontario government, in consultation with the Chief Medical Officer of Health, is taking further action to provide additional protection to high-risk settings, and continue to safeguard hospitals and ICU capacity as the province continues to rapidly accelerate its booster dose rollout. Based on the latest evidence and Ontario’s high rate of vaccination, the province is also updating testing and isolation guidelines to protect our most vulnerable and maintain the stability of critical workforces, including frontline health care workers, first responders and critical infrastructure like energy and food and supply chains.

Return to Class Following the Winter Break

In response to the highly-transmissible Omicron variant, Ontario is putting in place additional health and safety measures to create more layers of protection to keep schools as safe as possible for in-person learning, which is critical to the positive mental health and academic success of students.

The Children’s Health Coalition – representing Ontario’s children’s hospitals, mental health agencies and rehabilitation centres – has emphasized that in-person education is critical to the mental health, development and well-being of children and youth. Students are set to return to schools on January 5, 2022 for school boards previously scheduled to return on January 3 to provide schools additional time to prepare for the public health measures announced today. The following additional measures will help ensure safer schools and protect in-person learning:

  • Updating the COVID-19 school and child care screener ahead of the return to school on January 5 and asking students, parents and staff for rigorous screening and monitoring of symptoms.
  • Providing non-fit-tested N95 masks for staff in schools and licensed child care settings as an optional alternative to medical/surgical masks, and additional supply of high-quality three-ply cloth masks that are strongly encouraged and free for students and children in January.
  • Deploying an additional 3,000 standalone HEPA filter units to school boards, building on the existing 70,000 HEPA filter units and ventilation devices already in schools.
  • Continuing PCR testing eligibility for symptomatic elementary and secondary students, education staff and participating private and First Nation operated schools who have received a PCR self-collection kit through their school.
  • Starting in January, temporarily permitting only low-contact indoor sports and safe extra-curricular activities.
  • Updating COVID-19 reporting requirements for school boards and child care in January.
  • Supporting the projected hiring of over 2,000 staff, funded by a $304 million allocation for second semester that includes additional teachers, custodians, and mental health workers.

Further Reducing the Spread of COVID-19 in Larger Indoor Settings

To further strengthen its response to Omicron and reduce opportunities for close contact as the province gets as many vaccines into arms as possible, effective 12:01 a.m. on Friday, December 31, 2021, Ontario is restricting spectator capacity to 50 per cent of the usual seating capacity or 1,000 people, whichever is less, in the indoor areas of the following settings:

  • Spectator areas of facilities used for sports and recreational fitness activities (e.g., sporting events);
  • Concert venues; and
  • Theatres.

The government and the Chief Medical Officer of Health will continue to monitor the data to determine when it is safe to lift capacity limits in these settings.

“As cases continue to rise at a rapid rate and evidence on the Omicron variant evolves, our response needs to evolve alongside other jurisdictions to ensure those living and working in our highest-risk settings are protected,” said Dr. Kieran Moore, Chief Medical Officer of Health. “Ontario’s cautious approach and high vaccination rates have helped keep hospital and intensive care unit capacity stable to date. Focusing our testing and case and contact management on high-risk settings will help limit transmission, maintain critical workforces, and ensure timely access to PCR testing where it is needed the most. Anyone who is sick should protect their community by staying home.”

COVID-19 public health measures and advice | COVID-19 (coronavirus) in  Ontario

Updated Testing and Isolation Guidelines in Response to Omicron

In consultation with the Chief Medical Officer of Health, Ontario is updating its COVID-19 testing and isolation guidelines. These updates follow recent changes in other jurisdictions in Canada and the United Kingdom to ensure publicly funded testing and case and contact management resources are available for the highest-risk settings and to protect the most vulnerable and help keep critical services running.

Effective December 31, publicly-funded PCR testing will be available only for high-risk individuals who are symptomatic and/or are at risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including for the purposes of confirming a COVID-19 diagnosis to begin treatment, and workers and residents in the highest risk settings, as well as vulnerable populations. Members of the general public with mild symptoms are asked not to seek testing. A full list of eligible individuals can be found here.

In addition, most individuals with a positive result from a rapid antigen test will no longer be required or encouraged to get a confirmatory PCR or rapid molecular test.

Ontario is also changing the required isolation period based on growing evidence that generally healthy people with COVID-19 are most infectious in the two days before and three days after symptoms develop. Individuals with COVID-19 who are vaccinated, as well as children under 12, will be required to isolate for five days following the onset of symptoms. Their household contacts are also required to isolate with them. These individuals can end isolation after five days if their symptoms are improved for at least 24 hours and all public health and safety measures, such as masking and physical distancing, are followed. Non-household contacts are required to self-monitor for ten days.

Individuals who are unvaccinated, partially vaccinated or immunocompromised will be required to isolate for 10 days. While individuals who work or live in high-risk health care settings are recommended to return to work after 10 days from their last exposure or symptom onset or from their date of diagnosis, to ensure sufficient staffing levels workers will have the opportunity to return to work after isolating for seven days with negative PCR or rapid antigen test results, which will be provided by the province through the health care setting.

As of December 20, a total of 49.6 million rapid antigen tests have been deployed since the beginning of the pandemic, with the vast majority (approximately 41 million) deployed to priority sectors, including hospitals, long-term care and retirement homes and schools. In addition to Ontario directly procuring additional rapid tests where possible, the province is continuing to urge the federal government to make more rapid tests available to provinces as quickly as possible. The province is also evaluating the potential role of antibody testing, including an analysis of how it is used in other jurisdictions, to provide another tool in the fight against COVID-19.

Return to Class Following the Winter Break

In response to the highly-transmissible Omicron variant, Ontario is putting in place additional health and safety measures to create more layers of protection to keep schools as safe as possible for in-person learning, which is critical to the positive mental health and academic success of students.

The Children’s Health Coalition – representing Ontario’s children’s hospitals, mental health agencies and rehabilitation centres – has emphasized that in-person education is critical to the mental health, development and well-being of children and youth. Students are set to return to schools on January 5, 2022 for school boards previously scheduled to return on January 3 to provide schools additional time to prepare for the public health measures announced today. The following additional measures will help ensure safer schools and protect in-person learning:

  • Updating the COVID-19 school and child care screener ahead of the return to school on January 5 and asking students, parents and staff for rigorous screening and monitoring of symptoms.
  • Providing non-fit-tested N95 masks for staff in schools and licensed child care settings as an optional alternative to medical/surgical masks, and additional supply of high-quality three-ply cloth masks that are strongly encouraged and free for students and children in January.
  • Deploying an additional 3,000 standalone HEPA filter units to school boards, building on the existing 70,000 HEPA filter units and ventilation devices already in schools.
  • Continuing PCR testing eligibility for symptomatic elementary and secondary students, education staff and participating private and First Nation operated schools who have received a PCR self-collection kit through their school.
  • Starting in January, temporarily permitting only low-contact indoor sports and safe extra-curricular activities.
  • Updating COVID-19 reporting requirements for school boards and child care in January.
  • Supporting the projected hiring of over 2,000 staff, funded by a $304 million allocation for second semester that includes additional teachers, custodians, and mental health workers.

Further Reducing the Spread of COVID-19 in Larger Indoor Settings

To further strengthen its response to Omicron and reduce opportunities for close contact as the province gets as many vaccines into arms as possible, effective 12:01 a.m. on Friday, December 31, 2021, Ontario is restricting spectator capacity to 50 per cent of the usual seating capacity or 1,000 people, whichever is less, in the indoor areas of the following settings:

  • Spectator areas of facilities used for sports and recreational fitness activities (e.g., sporting events);
  • Concert venues; and
  • Theatres.

The government and the Chief Medical Officer of Health will continue to monitor the data to determine when it is safe to lift capacity limits in these settings.

Offering Fourth Doses to Long-Term Care Residents

Based on the recommendations from the Ontario Immunization Advisory Committee, effective immediately the province will be making fourth doses of mRNA vaccines available to residents of long-term care homes, retirement homes, Elder Care Lodges and other congregate care settings if at least three months, or 84 days, have passed since their third dose.

In response to the uniquely high-risk nature of long-term care settings for Ontario’s most vulnerable individuals, the province is also mandating third doses for all staff, students, volunteers, caregivers and support workers by January 28, 2022 for those currently eligible for a booster, and will be requiring visitors to provide proof of a booster dose once the temporary pause on general visitors is lifted.

As of December 13, 2021, all staff had to be fully vaccinated to work in long-term care homes, unless they have a valid medical exemption. To date, nearly 47 per cent of eligible staff and nearly 86 per cent of eligible residents have received their third dose booster. The province will continue to monitor long-term care homes and adjust measures as necessary to keep residents safe.

The government and the Chief Medical Officer of Health will continue to monitor trends in key public health and health care indicators, including emerging data on the Omicron variant and will continue to take swift action to ensure the health and safety of Ontarians.

#LSN_Health  #LSN_SSM  #LSnews_TBay 

Below Please Rate and Share this story 
To help us learn what is important to you
 

Previous Article Canadians Should Be Outraged By Authoritarian Mass Surveillance
Next Article COOK COUNTY CONNECTIONS 2022 County Infrastructure Projects
Print
Rate this article:
No rating
0Upvote 1Downvote

Covid and test During Ontario Lockdown

December 26th is day one of lockdown in Ontario 

Date Tests #Cases  Date Test Cases Date  Tests Cases
Dec 26   2,142 Jan 11     Jan 26 30,700 1,740
Dec 27   2,005 Jan 12     Jan 27 55,200 1,670
Dec 28   1,939 Jan 13     Jan 28 64,700 2,093
Dec 29   2,553 Jan 14     Jan 29 69,000 1,837
Dec 30 39,200 2,923 Jan 15     Jan 30 59,600 2,063
Dec 31   3,328 Jan16  73,900 3,056 Jan 31 49,400 1,848
Jan 1   2,476       Feb 1 30,400 1,969
Jan 2   3,363 Jan 17     Feb 2 28,600 745
Jan 3 49,800 2,964 Jan 18     Feb 3 52,400 1,172
Jan
4
    Jan 19     Feb 4 64,500 1,563
Jan 5 35,200 3,128 Jan 20     Feb 5  62,700 1,670
Jan 6     Jan 21 70,300 2,632 Feb 6 62,300 1,388
Jan 7     Jan 22 71,800 2,662 Feb 7 51,700 1,489
Jan 8     Jan 23 63,500 2,359 Feb 8  28,300 1,265

Jan 9

72,900 3,443 Jan 24  48,900 2,417 Feb 9 30,800 1,022
Jan 10     Jan 25 36,000 1,958 Feb 10 52,500 1,072

Follow the numbers for TBDHU Easter Month Long Lockdown

Population of Thunder Bay District (2016)  146,048
April 8th 1st stay of stay at home order for 28 days

Date New
Cases
Active
Cases 
Resolved 
Cases
Deceased Hospitalized ICU
Apr 3 26 183 2673 53 12 3
Apr 5   9 163 2701 54 14 4
Apr 6  1 149 2716 54 14 5
Apr 7 15 148 2732 54 10 4
Apr 8  3 104 2779 54 10 4
Apr 9 12 101 2793 55 12 5
Apr 10 13   98 2809 55 13 5
Apr 11 Not  Reported        
Apr 12 13 91 2829 55 14 5
Apr 13 9 87 2841 56 13 4
Apr 14 4 72 2860 56 11 4
Apr 15 4 61 2875 56 10 5
Apri16 8 57 2885 58 12 4
Apr 17 4 56 2890 58 9 3
    Not  reported  Today    
             
Apr 20 11 54 2909 60 7 2
Apr 21  6 52 2916 61 7 2
Apr 22 11 59 2919 62 8 2
Apr 23 10 61 2927 62 8 2
Apr 24 10 67 2931 62 9 2
    Not  Reported  On Sundays    
Apr 26 10 69 2939 62 7 0
Apr 27  6 66 2948 62 8 2
Apr 28  5 61 2958 62 8 0
Apr 29 15 67 2967 62 7 0
Apr 30  1 63 2972 62 6 0
May 1  7 54 2988 62 6 1
May 2   Not Reported  On Sundays     
May 3 9 48 3003 62 6 1
May 4 6 44 3013 62 4 0
May 5 5 45 3017 62 5 0
May 6 5 45 3022 62 5 1
May 7 2 41 3028 62 3 1
May 8 5 37 3037 62 3 1
May 9   Not Reported  On Sundays    
May 10  7 40 3041 62 4 1
May 11  0 29 3052 62 3 1
May 12  8 31 3058 62 4 1
May 13  6 36 3059 62 4 1
May 14  4 34 3065 62 4 1
May 15  4 32 3071 62 4 1
May 16  Do  Not Report  On Sundays     
May 17  3 29 3077 62 4 1
May 18  1 25 3079 63 2 0
May 19  1 24 3081 63 2 0
May 20  7 31 3081 63 4 0
May 21  1 28 3085 63 5 0
May 22  4 25 3092 63 5 0
May 23 Do  Not  report  On Holidays     
May 24 Do Not  report  On Holidays     
May 25 4 24 3097 63 5 0
May 26  1 17 3105 63 3 0
May 27  5 19 3108 63 4 0
May 28 18
14
 3
 1
 33
First Nation
Distict 
TBay
3112 63 4 0
May 29 9
6
3
0
42
First Nation
Distict 
Thunder Bay
3117 63 5 0
May 30 Do  Not Report  on  Sundays    
May 31

17
8
4
5

54
First Nation
District 
Thunder Bay
3117 63 4 0
June  1  3
2
1
54
Thunder Bay
First Nation 
3120 63 3 0
June 2 4
2
2

Thunder Bay
First Nation
       
June 3 11
2
5
4
61
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3128 63 6 0
June 4 21
 1
13
 7
75
Thunder Bay
First Nation
Disrict 
3273 63 7 0
June 5 16
6

2
81
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3289 63 6 0
June 6 Do  Not  report on  Sunday     
June 7

10
 3
 6
 1

67
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3169 63 7 1
June 8   
 0
 0 
 1
 60
Thunder Bay
First Natiomn 
 District  
3175 63 5 1
June 9  
0
1

 
56
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3181 63 5 1
June 10

3
0
1

51
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3190 63 5 1
June 11  1
3
0
47
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
 
3198 63 5 2
June 12
1
 2
3
39
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District
       
June 13 Do  Not  remport on  Sunday  
June 14

1
5
0
 
33
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District
3224 63 6 3
June 15 1
2
0
33
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3227 63 6 3
June 16
1
3
1
35
Thunder Bay
First Nation 
District 
3230 63 6 3
June 17
1
0
0
31
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District
3234 64 4 2
June 18
1
0
0
29
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3235 64 5 2
June 19
0
1
0
23
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3242 64 4 2
June 20 Do not report  on  Sundays  
June 21

1
0
1

14
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3253 64 4 2
June 22
0
0
0
12
Thunder Bay
First Nation 
Districtg 
3255 64 3 2
June 23


0
0
0

9
Thunder Bay
First Nation 
District 
3258 64 3 2
June 24


0
1
2

10
Thunder Bay
First Nation 
District 
3260 64 3 2
June 25
1
0
0
10
Thunder Bay
First Nation
District 
3261 64 3 2
June 26
June 27
  No longer  Available  on  Weekends  
June 28

2
0
0
 
9
Thunder Bay
First Nation
Distict 
3264 64 3 1
June 29 0 6 3267 64 2 0
June 30 0 6 3267 64 2 0
             

 

Follow the Ontario numbers for Easter Month Long Lockdown

Ontario's 3rd lockdown start April 3 at 12.01 am. 
April 8th 1st stay of stay at home order for 28 days

Date Test Cases  Date  Tests Cases
May
31
18,200 916 June 16 28,100 384
June 
1
20,300 699 June 17 30,500 370
June 3 34,300 870 June 18 26,600 345
June 4 32,300 914 June 19 25,400 355
June 5 27,800 744 June 20 21,100 318
June 6 22,600 663 June 21 13,800 270
June 7 15,200 525 June 22 16,800 296
June 8 17,600 469 June 23 27,400 255
June 9 30,500 411 June 24 29,500 296
June 10 31,400 590 June 25 26,600 256

June 11

28,900 574 June 26 25,600 346
June 12  24,100 502 June 27 18,500 287
June 13 20,700 530 June 28 13,100 210
June 14 13,600 447 June 29 28,300 299
June 15 17,200 296 June 30 184 27,300

 

Date Test Cases Date  Test  Cases Date  Test  Cases  Date  Test Cases
April 1  62,300 2,557 Apr 16 64,300 4,812 May  1 46,800 3,369 May 16 33,100 2,199
Apr 2 121,400 3,089 Apr 17  56,900 4,362 May 2 45,300 3,732 May 17 24,500 2,170
Apr 3   3,009 Apr 18 53,800 4,250 May 3 33,200 3,436 May 18 22,900 1,616
Apr 4   3,041 apr 19 42,900 4,447 May 4 33,700 2,791 May 19 38,400 1,588
Apr 5    2,938 Apr 20 40,600 3,469 May 5 45,800 2,941 May 20 45,400 2,400
Apr 6 37,500 3,065 Apr 21 51,900 4,212 May 6 54,100 3,424 May 21 37,100 1,890
Apr 7 49,900 3,215 apr 22 54,200 3,682 May 7 51,300 3,166 May 22 34,600 1,794
Apr 8 63,800 3,295 apr 23 56,200 4,505 May 8 47,800 2,864 May 23 31,200 1,691
Apr 9 61,400 4,227 Apr 24 52,200 4,094 May 9 38,500 3,216 May 24 16,900 1,446
Apr 10 61,400 3,813 Apr 25 46,700 3,947 May 10 27,200 2,716 May 25 20,200 1039
Apr 11 56,400 4,456 Apr 26 33,800 3,510 May 11 28,100 2,073 May 26 24,000 1,095
apr 12 47,900 4,401 Apr 27 34,000 3,265 May 12 45,700 2,320 May 27 37,700 1,135
Apr 13 42,200 3,670 Apr 28  50,200 3,480 May 13 47,600 2,759 May 28 40,900 1,273
Apr 14  54,200 4,156 Apr 29 56,900 3,871 May 14 44,000 2,362 May 29 33,600 1,057
Apr 15 65,600 4,736 Apr 30 53,100 3,887 May 15 42,300 2,584 May 30 26,600 1,033

 

TBDHU goes into Grey Lockdown March 1st 12.01 am.

Population of Thunder Bay District (2016)  146,048

Date  New
Cases
Active
Cases 
Resolved
Cases 
Deceased  Hospitalized 
ICU
Feb 27   335 1218 30 23 7
Feb 28   343 1239 30 26 9
March 1 56 376 1262 30 29 9
March 2  40 374 1304 30 26 9
March 3  26 389 1314 31 29 10
March 4 61 397 1366 32 29 10
March 5 48 389 1422 32 27 8
March 6 40 386 1465 32 35 11
March 7 111 470 1492 32 37 11
March 8 30 462 1529 33 36 10
March 9  58 458 1589 35 29 9
March 10 46 414 1677 37 31 10
March 11 46 423 1714 37 35 9
March 12 82 435 1784 37 35 8
March 13 43 446 1816 37 36 9
March 14 40 437 1865 37 37 9
March 15 51 446 1906 38 44 7
March 16 35 403 1984 38 39 8
March 17 68 424 2030 39 38 8
March 18 40 406 2088 39 39 12
March 19 38 399 2133 39 44 15
March 20 32 379 2185 39 45 16
March 21 20 362 2222 39 35 12
March 22  9 325 2267 40 35 12
March 23 29 305 2316 40 31 7
March 24 25 286 2355 45 26 5
March 25 33 283 2390 46 28 5
March 26 20 259 2434 46 28 4
March 27 29 233 2488 47 20 3
March 28  21 216 2526 47 19 4
March 29 12 207 2547 47 19 4
March 30 25 199 2576 51 17 3
March 31 34 216 2592 52 18 3
April 1 23 210 2621 52 18 3
             
             
             
             

This is the total number of deaths among cases in which COVID-19 was determined to be a contributing or underlying cause of death

 

Number of Test and Number of Cases of COVID Ontario

Date Tests Cases Date Tests  Cases  Date Tests Cases
Feb 11 68,800 945 Mar 1 35,000 1,023 Mar 19 56,100 1,745
Feb 12 62,000 1,076 Mar 2  30,800 966 Mar 20 52,100 1,829
Feb 13 58,800 1,300 Mar 3 52,600 958 Mar 21 49,200 1,791
Feb 14 48,700 981 Mar 4 65,600 994 Mar 22 31,100 1,699
Feb 15 27,000 964 Mar 5  64,700 1,250 Mar 23 32,600 1,546

Feb 16

30,400 904 Mar 6 57,800 990 Mar 24 52,000 1,571
Feb 17 34,000 847 Mar 7 46,600 329 Mar 25 60,100 2,380
Feb 18 56,200 1,038 Mar 8 38,100 568 Mar 26 53,400 2,169
Feb 19 65,400 1,150 Mar 9  33,300 1,185 Mar 27 61,000 2,453
Feb 20 57,200 1,228 Mar 10 54,100 1,316 Mar 28  50,200 2,448
Feb 21 Not report Not Report Mar 11 60,600 1,092 Mar 29  39,500 2,094
Feb 22 31,200 1,058 Mar 12 64,600 1,371 Mar 30  36,100 2,336
Feb 23 26,000 975 Mar 13  58,400 1,468 Mar 31 52,500 2,333
Feb 24  54,900 1,054 Mar 14 47,600 1,747 April 1  62,300 2,557
Feb 25 66,400 1,138 Mar 15 34,000 1,268      
Feb 26 64,000 1,258 Mar 16 28,500 1,074       
Feb 27 59,400 1,185 Mar 17 49,100 1,508      
Feb 28 49,200 1,062 Mar 18 58,600 1,553      
                 

 

Follow LSN on Twitter

Social Media

 Twitter Lake Superior New  Face Book Lake Superior News  Lake Superior Circle Tour Calendar  You Tube Lake Superior News

Latest Health News

Back To Top